Healthcare of Ontario Pension Plan (HOOPP) doubled ILS allocation in 2020

ARTEMIS: The Healthcare of Ontario Pension Plan (HOOPP), a large Canadian institutional retirement fund, has more than doubled its investments in the insurance-linked securities (ILS) asset class over the last year.

Insurance-linked securities (ILS), so investments into insurance-linked funds as well as some other reinsurance related securities, began in earnest for the Healthcare of Ontario Pension Plan (HOOPP) in late 2019.

Then in early 2020, HOOPP employed Bernard Van der Stichele, an experienced ILS and reinsurance sector executive, as a Portfolio Manager for its new Insurance-linked Securities investment program earlier this year.

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World Bank fully supportive of direct sovereign risk transfer: Bennett

ARTEMIS: The efforts of the World Bank around disaster risk financing for its members continues to be a real benefit, and while the organisation can and will do more, this isn’t about being the dominant force in the market, according to Michael Bennett, Head of Derivatives & Structured Finance, World Bank Treasury.

During last month’s annual ILS conference in New York City, held virtually for the first time owing to restrictions, Artemis spoke with Bennett about the World Bank’s use of reinsurance and insurance-linked securities (ILS) structures for member governments, and how this might evolve in the future.

So far, the World Bank has transferred some $4.5 billion of risk to the markets, of which the large majority (65%) has been via ILS structures; showing how beneficial capital markets-backed protection has been for both the organisation and its members.

FULL ORIGINAL PUBLICATION HERE

Peak Re: Bridging the protection gap in emerging markets

Large and getting larger: Emerging Asia’s protection gaps

The prevalence of under-insurance and non-insurance in emerging markets is well-documented.[1] The proverbial protection gap persists across different risks, from property to health and mortality, variously also extending to include longevity and liability. There are many reasons underpinning the large protection gap and low insurance penetration in emerging markets, which can be summarised as the “Triple-A Conundrum” – i.e. lack of Accessibility, Affordability and Awareness.[2] These are considered key impediments to deepen insurance penetration in emerging markets including those in the Asia-Pacific region.

Empirical research on protection gaps has been stymied by a lack of data and standard definitions. In fact, different protection gaps are measured differently. For the property including natural catastrophe (nat cat) protection gap, it is measured in most cases as the difference between economic and insured losses over a period.[3] Mortality protection gap is the short-fall in household financial assets to sustain the living of surviving family members, in case of pre-mature death of the household breadwinner. The more challenging health protection gap is sometimes gauged by out-of-pocket expenses, while some estimates also consider the risk of catastrophic medical bills and non-treatment because of affordability and other reasons.

Notwithstanding the capriciousness of definitions and a dearth of data, empirical research is pointing to large protection gaps in emerging markets.[4] The gaps are of particular concern in emerging Asia, due to the region’s large population and fast economic growth. For instance, it is estimated that emerging Asia accounted for around 40% of the global health and mortality protection gaps, and some 20% of the nat cat protection gap.[5] The gaps are also widening. With property and nat cat protection gap, the rise in asset values particularly in disaster-prone coastal regions has outpaced the growth of insurance cover. This could have aggravated by increasing frequency and severity of calamities. Life-style considerations, rising medical inflation and aging population are some of the factors behind a widening health and mortality protection gap in emerging Asia. While the region has witnessed sustained strong life premium growth over the past decades, much of which is believed to be savings-type insurance policies.

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Hannover Re cedes up to 32% of cats, 24% of COVID losses to retro in 2020

ARTEMIS: German reinsurance giant Hannover Re benefited from its retrocessional protections throughout 2020, potentially ceding almost one-third of natural catastrophe losses and 24% of its losses from the COVID-19 pandemic.

The reinsurer reported its full-year 2020 results this morning, revealing that large losses came in well above budget for its P&C reinsurance business due to the contribution of the pandemic.

Hannover Re reported almost EUR 1.6 billion of net major losses in 2020, 950.1 million of which was from the COVID-19 pandemic.

FULL ORIGINAL PUBLICATION HERE