Pacific Alliance hopes to expand cat bond to cover cyclones, floods, droughts

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The Pacific Alliance, a Latin American trade bloc made up of Chile, Colombia, Mexico and Peru, would like to expand on the coverage provided by their catastrophe bonds, with hydro-meteorological risks including tropical cyclones, drought, floods and even cold weather all mooted as potential perils to include.

The Ministries of Finance of the Pacific Alliance members met in late 2020 to discuss next steps in their disaster risk financing and catastrophe bond journey.

The Pacific Alliance trade bloc nations in Latin America currently benefit from a combined $1.36 billion of catastrophe bond backed earthquake insurance protection, in a landmark multi-country cat bond issuance brought to market in early 2018.

Catastrophe protection gap needs capital market support: Bernardino, EIOPA

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Gabriel Bernardino, the soon to retire Chairman of the European Insurance and Occupational Pensions Authority (EIOPA), has highlighted the capital markets role in delivering catastrophe insurance that has fewer protection gaps.

In an interview with Brink News, Bernardino explained the need for multi-peril catastrophe insurance and reinsurance coverage that protects against the uncovered portion of risks, such as non-damage business interruption related to a pandemic or other peril, just as much as physical property damage.

“I think there is a clear recognition from all parties, that the current situation — when we look at the coverage of business interruption — is far from optimal. It creates risks for the companies and reputational risks for the insurance market,” Bernardino explained.

Jamaica: World Bank cat bond still underway. Gets CCRIF rainfall payout for Zeta & Eta

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Jamaica continues to work with the World Bank on a first catastrophe bond for the country the Finance Ministry has said and reflecting the importance of disaster risk financing, in recent weeks it has received a roughly $3.5 million payout under its parametric CCRIF insurance coverage.

The payout comes after the torrential rainfall from tropical cyclones Zeta and Eta impacted the Caribbean island nation triggered the parametric excess rainfall protection that Jamaica has.

The CCRIF SPC (formerly known as the Caribbean Catastrophe Risk Insurance Facility) provides excess rainfall parametric insurance coverage, as well as parametric risk transfer for peak perils such as hurricanes and earthquakes.

Mexico’s cat bond coverage continues, despite shuttering of FONDEN

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Mexico’s still in-force $485 million IBRD / FONDEN 2020  catastrophe bond will continue to provide the country with important disaster insurance protection, as the beneficiary of the cover has been shifted away from the shuttered FONDEN disaster fund to the country’s Treasury.

We’re told that a notification has been sent to investors in and holders of the World Bank issued Mexican catastrophe bond, to explain that the coverage it provides will continue uninterrupted, despite Mexico’s Fund for Natural Disasters (El Fondo de Desastres Naturales), more commonly known as FONDEN, having been dismantled.

As we reported last October, FONDEN was set to be dismantled after Mexico’s lawmakers in the senate voted to reform that area of public funding.

World Bank supports Central Asia Multi-Peril Risk Assessment

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Central Asian countries will benefit from a better understanding of their natural disaster risks, which in time could lead to greater use of risk transfer, insurance and reinsurance capacity in the region, as the World Bank supports a multi-peril risk assessment project for the region.

One of the first steps in moving towards sovereign disaster risk transfer, such as use of insurance, reinsurance or catastrophe bond type arrangements, tends to be in the development of risk modelling tools to enhance the understanding of exposures in a country.

To that end, the World Bank, alongside its partners, has launched an initiative to provide a multi-peril risk assessment of natural disaster risks, including earthquakes, floods and selected landslides within the Central Asia region.

Indonesia cat bond possible, as World Bank lends for disaster insurance

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The World Bank has approved $500 million of funding for Indonesia to help the country enhance its financial response to natural disasters, climate risks, and health-related shocks, with the use of risk pooling, and insurance or reinsurance instruments at the heart of the plan.

Between 2014 and 2018, the central government of Indonesia has spent between US$90 million and US$500 million annually on disaster response and recovery, the World Bank explained, while Indonesia’s local governments spent an estimated additional $250 million over the same period.

With the cost of natural disasters and severe weather events expected to keep increasing further due to climate change and also urban growth, the World Bank notes that these costs will pressure Indonesia’s government public spending.

Tre Hapa për të Ndihmuar Shqipërinë për të Përballuar Ndikimet Financiare të Shkaktuara nga Fatkeqësitë dhe Krizat

PUBLIKIMI I PLOT ORIGJINAL KTU

Në vitin 2019, Shqipëria u përball me një seri tërmetesh, ndër të cilët edhe një me magnitudë të lartë; më pas, mes përpjekjeve për rindërtim në vitin 2020, u godit edhe nga pandemia COVID-19. E përballur me nevojat e shumta në rritje, mbështetja e qeverisë shqiptare shkoi për të varfërit dhe personat e prekur nga fatkeqësitë dhe krizat, përfshirë këtu edhe bizneset. Për ta realizuar këtë, ajo shfrytëzoi rezervat fiskale, rishpërndau buxhetet për përparësitë urgjente dhe u mbështet tek ndihma e jashtme. Shumë nga këto masa u ndërmorën në bazë të nevojës.

Në shtator 2020, Banka Botërore së bashku me Ministrinë e Financave dhe Ekonomisë,  kreu vlerësimin diagnostikues në lidhje me financimin e riskut të fatkeqësive në Shqipëri.[1] Kjo përpjekje kishte për qëllim identifikimin e mangësive të financimit të mekanizmave për gatishmërinë financiare të vendit në rast fatkeqësish dhe rekomandimin e mënyrave për përmirësimin e tyre.

Menaxhimi i riskut të fatkeqësive është ndër përparësitë kryesore të politikave në Republikën e Shqipërisë dhe, pak kohë para tërmetit, qeveria shqiptare kreu edhe një seri reformash në këtë drejtim, si për shembull: miratimi i Ligjit të ri për Mbrojtjen Civile, racionalizimi i kornizave institucionale, decentralizimi i funksioneve që aktivizohen pas fatkeqësive dhe vënia në dispozicion e strukturave të nevojshme për fondet e emergjencës në nivel vendor dhe në nivel ministrie të linjës.

Three Steps to Help Albania Withstand the Financial Impacts of Disasters and Crises

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In 2019, Albania experienced a series of earthquakes, including a major one; then, amid reconstruction efforts in 2020, it was hit by the COVID-19 pandemic. Confronting multiple increasing needs, the government of Albania supported the poor and those affected by disasters and crises, including businesses. To do so, it tapped into its fiscal reserves, reallocated budgets toward urgent priorities, and relied on external assistance. Many of these measures were ad hoc.

In September 2020, jointly with Albania’s Ministry of Finance and Economy, the World Bank completed a diagnostic of disaster risk finance in Albania[1]. This effort sought to identify financing gaps in—and recommend ways to improve—the country’s financial preparedness for disasters.

Disaster risk management is among Albania’s key policy priorities, and the Albanian government carried out a series of reforms shortly before the earthquake: for instance, it enacted a new Law on Civil Protection, streamlined institutional frameworks, decentralized post-disaster functions, and put in place structures for contingency funds at the local and line ministry level.

Brazil’s regulator targeting ILS for the right (domestic) reasons

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With Brazil’s government having recently formalised and published legislation related to special purpose reinsurance transformer vehicles and insurance-linked securities (ILS) issuance, the country’s insurance regulator Susep has said it hopes the regime will reduce reinsurance costs for carriers.

As a result of which, Brazil’s regulator the Superintendência de Seguros Privados (Susep) hopes that introducing direct capital market’s sources of third-party reinsurance and retrocession capital can ultimately help to lower insurance costs for the country’s consumers.

Brazil’s insurance and reinsurance market regulator Susep had been seeing feedback on a framework for legislation and a regulatory regime to allow for the issuance of insurance-linked securities (ILS) in Brazil.

Can insurance-linked securities mobilize investment in climate adaptation?

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The cost of adapting to climate change increases every year. Between now and 2030, adaptation in developing countries is projected to cost US$180 billion annually and skyrockets to US$280-500 billion as we get closer to 2050. The past five years are among the warmest ever recorded and the economic impacts from tropical storms, droughts and wildfires are reaching record levels around the world. Despite the need to improve our resilience, investments in early warning systems, climate resilient infrastructure, improved agriculture, natural capital such as mangroves and coral reefs, and water resource management, have remained stagnant. Adaptation finance still represents a fraction of overall climate finance and less than 20 percent of what is needed, even if absolute numbers are slowly rising US$22 to US$35 billion from 2016 to 2018).

But closing the gap between current adaptation financing levels and the need is a challenge. Public sector budgets are maxed out and attracting desperately needed private investment remains notoriously elusive. The challenge to mobilizing private investment into adaptation and resilience projects has always been–how do we get our money back? While we’ve been debating adaptation’s return on investment, the damages from intensifying hurricanes, wildfires, and droughts as a result of the climate crisis have cost hundreds of billions of dollars and displaced millions of people.